8. Cerebral Palsy Research Registry

Cerebral Palsy Research RegistryCerebral Palsy Research Registry (CPRR) is a multi-institutional collaborative effort whose primary mission is to improve our understanding of cerebral palsy. Representatives from Northwestern University Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and the University of Chicago have developed and continually improve the CPRR to promote research and new discovery in the field of cerebral palsy.

9. Columbia University Center for Cerebral Palsy Research

ctc-head-tc_textResearch projects in this center focus on improving the lives of children with physical disabilities. The staff includes highly skilled physical therapists and occupational therapists and a psychologist, and consultants, including a pediatric neurologist and social worker.

10. Cerebral Palsy Research Consortium of Michigan

cprcombannertop2cropThe goal of CPRCoM is to promote and accelerate cerebral palsy (CP) research aimed at measuring prevention strategies, treatment outcomes, and maximizing quality of life and community participation for persons with CP. United Cerebral Palsy of Michigan and the Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living are community partners of the CPRCoM.

Blogs

11. Love That Max

Love That MaxEllen Seidman started Love That Maxi in October 2008 as an inspirational, informational, occasionally irreverent blog. She regularly writes about her son, Max, who was born with Cerebral Palsy. In addition she writes about topics that are relevant to special needs families.

12. Aaronverse

AaronverseRecently profiled in the New York Times, Aaronverse is a Tumblr blog where Aaron Philip writes about his life dealing with his disability, and how it makes things different for him. He also post drawings, Frederator things, Pusheen stuff, Adventure Time and anything interesting.

13. The CP Diary

TheCPdiary“What is it like living with cerebral palsy? I cannot truly answer that question as for 46 years of my life I didn’t know it was, because at the end of March 2009 I was finally diagnosed. How did I feel as the child then, the adult now? Those times were enormously difficult for me. Some days I felt isolated, angry, cheated, misunderstood and frustrated. Other days I felt insular and alone. It wasn’t something my family talked about. “There was never anything wrong with me.” It was never brought up unless I talked about it then it was quickly dismissed like hot cakes as if the condition didn’t exist. But it did!”

Books about Cerebral Palsy

14. Out Of My Mind

Out of My MindMelody is not like most people. She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom—the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged, because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she’s determined to let everyone know it…somehow. In this breakthrough story—reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly—from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone with a disability.

15. Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Parent’s Guide

CPBook1The future is brighter then ever for children with cerebral palsy — the most common developmental disability among young people today. With advances in medicine, early intervention, and therapy, these children can maximize their potential and lead healthy, rewarding lives. But perhaps the most important influence of all comes from parents who provide constant support and encouragement. This is essential reading for all parents who want to learn about cerebral palsy and how it will affect their child and family.
 
Source: http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2013/11/06/20-cerebral-palsy-resources-you-should-know-about/

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