Screen-shot-2012-05-22-at-4.38.39-PM-e1337722327440
Look, I’m just as tired of writing about being sick as you probably are of reading about it.
That grammar felt wrong. My brain hurts. I’m sorry.
Let me take this time to show you how huge Tyler is:

I gave him that outfit. It has a monkey face on the butt.
Anyway. I don’t want to write about this dumb Crohn’s stuff anymore, but it’s unfortunately a big ol’ part of my life at the moment, so let’s talk it out a bit.
When people hear I have Crohn’s disease, they tend to make several assumptions:

  • That I go to the bathroom a lot. (True.)
  • That I have “bad stomachaches.” (True, but let’s change “bad” to “F-ing awful.)
  • That I have “Chron’s disease.” (So false. Please stop misspelling the name of this disease, especially if you have it!)

But since that doesn’t sum it all up, let me help you out by sharing a few more of my own insights with you.
And remember, I’m no doctor. The only medical degree I’m worthy of possessing is a Ph.D in frozen yogurt science, and I don’t even know where I’m supposed to go to major in that. Directly to 16 Handles? Or is there a higher power I should seek out?

Everything I write about here is based on my experiences, my advice from doctors and my research from various sources. Take it all with an easily-digestible grain of salt.
You might have it — but you probably don’t. So you had to go to the bathroom after a weekend-long binge-fest? Raw vegetables don’t agree with your stomach and salad is your enemy? That’s fine, and that sucks. All digestive issues suck.
But just because you had to go to the bathroom urgently once or twice doesn’t mean you “definitely have Crohn’s.” If you truly think you may have a digestive disease, please go to the doctor. Get a colonoscopy. Drink some barium. Have a CT scan or an Upper or Lower GI. Do all those things, and then we can compare symptoms. Because I’m sorry, I can sympathize, but at some point you comparing your cramps to Crohn’s is OMG so frustrating.
I am not sick because I like running. I always welcome feedback and advice, truly I do. But if one more person tries to convince me I’m “sick because I’ve been working out,” I’m going to go ahead and punch something…or someone. So watch out.
Yes, I enjoy working out. Yes, I do that a lot, and yes, I am aware of that. No, I am not an idiot. (Really, I’m not. I just play one on the Internet.) Crohn’s disease and exercise, according to every doctor I’ve ever seen and all the current research I’ve read, are not intricately intertwined.
Obviously if I’m running myself ragged my body won’t recover, and having Crohn’s on top of that will tear me down. That, we can probably all agree, is something of a fact. But I’m not currently having a flare-up because of any exercise I’ve been doing.

What you read on my blog isn’t my full life — just because I say I went to a Chisel class doesn’t mean I went balls-to-the-wall hardcore with super-heavy weights, jumping around on top of things all Parkour-style. I know when to tone it down and I know which exercises my body can (sitting on a spin bike and taking it easy) and cannot (fast running, boo) handle.
Also, each day — each hour, each minute — during a flare-up is different. On Sunday, I felt OK enough to go out for a run. Yesterday and today, I couldn’t even fathom the thought of putting on sneakers or a sports bra. It’s constantly changing and totally unpredictable, so I don’t try to plan workouts because I know they may not happen and I don’t want to get discouraged.
Ultimately, exercise makes me feel good and most times it’s the one thing that keeps my mind off the fact that I’m flaring. So please, stop telling me to stop sweating. I did absolutely nothing yesterday beyond parking my ass on the couch and leaving a serious butt imprint. I wanted to spin, but I didn’t. Instead, I drank juice all day and was as lazy as possible. I didn’t even make a Sick Day To-Do List. Look at me, all chill and stuff.

NEXT PAGE >> 2

Share.

Leave A Reply